History and Heritage

 

A military history from 1560 to 1952

 

The Rame forts forms the western part of the most extensive and complete historic coastal defences in the UK.

 

The sixteenth-century Mount Edgcumbe Blockhouse, just behind the later Garden Battery is the earliest example on the Rame Peninsula.

 

The next main building phase was prompted by the outbreak of the War and American Independence in 1775.  Amherst Battery in Kingsand had already been built to repel any enemy force landing in Cawsand Bay, and the strategic importance of Maker Heights was realised with the construction of a number of redoubts in the 1780s.  Shortly afterwards, Maker Barracks was built to accommodate the garrison and the area was further fortified in the late nineteenth century with the addition of Maker, Grenville, Hawk-ins, and Raleigh Batteries.

 

The Heavy Anti-Aircraft battery behind the Barracks was built in the late 1930’s and altered in the 40’s.

The Bunker and concrete shelters on the Heights at Maker are a very important part of the 200 year long military history of the site. Most significantly, they formed part of the front-line defences of Plymouth during it’s greatest threat, the air-raids of the Second World War.

 

Many American troops were mustered on the Rame Peninsula before D-Day in 1944.

 

“By Monday evening 28 April [1941], we had seen the spectacle of a great city and dockyard in flames and the black smoke rising from the fuel tanks at Torpoint; we heard the startlingly sudden reports from the A.A. battery and the deep zoom of the naval guns”.  Dr H.J.Hewitt (the first Headmaster of Saltash County Grammar)

 

 

TOC past and present...

 

Nancy Astor was the first woman ever to sit as a member of Parliament.

It was Nancy Astor who suggested in 1925 that a committee investigate the possibility of establishing a camp for juveniles, out of concern for the effects of unemployment and poverty on their health and morale.

 

With the help of Government grants and the release to the Committee of Maker Barracks, Maker Camp was established In the summer of 1926 and a long history of providing holidays and fresh country air for children had begun.

 

Maker Camp took hundreds of boys and girls at a time, from organisations like the Kitto institute and the Boys  Brigade, for periods from a week-end to a whole month, allowing the children the space and nature of Maker and the Rame Peninsula as a relief from their lives in the city.

 

Between 1926 and 1985, thousands of children from many towns and cities in Britain came to Maker and enjoyed holidays, and it was only the lack of investment in the buildings that eventually led to the Camp closing down. Hardly a day goes by without Maker receiving a visitor from the past...

 

Familiar reminiscences are of the girls camped out in the nissen huts and the boys in the bar-rack rooms in the main building. There also seem to be plenty of stories about times when boys and girls were not quite where they were supposed to be

 

“Back in 1949 my late wife and I had our first kiss at this gate.”

 

In 2003 the rebuilt and considerably more comfortable nissen huts welcomed the first school groups back to Maker Heights for their residential trip. The visitors books are testament to new generations of young people once again enjoying their stay at Maker.

 

Canoeing and kayaking on Millbrook lake, problem solving and shelter building in Maker wood-lands and enjoying coastal walks are all part of the fun and games associated with the TOC

 

“One night in 1982, during a terrific storm, a tree crashed through the roof of the nissen hut, and sliced between the two rows of beds. The night-duty nurse simply clapped her hands and called “Come on girls! Chop Chop! Back into bed! Don’t make a fuss!”

 

 

 

Company Name:

MAKER WITH RAME COMMUNITY INTEREST COMPANY.

Registered Address: Insworke Mill, Mill Road, Millbrook. Cornwall. PL10 1EN

Company No: 10348127

A military history from 1560 to 1952

 

The Rame forts forms the western part of the most extensive and complete historic coastal defences in the UK.

 

The sixteenth-century Mount Edgcumbe Blockhouse, just behind the later Garden Battery is the earliest example on the Rame Peninsula.

 

The next main building phase was prompted by the outbreak of the War and American Independence in 1775.  Amherst Battery in Kingsand had already been built to repel any enemy force landing in Cawsand Bay, and the strategic importance of Maker Heights was realised with the construction of a number of redoubts in the 1780s.  Shortly afterwards, Maker Barracks was built to accommodate the garrison and the area was further fortified in the late nineteenth century with the addition of Maker, Grenville, Hawk-ins, and Raleigh Batteries.

 

The Heavy Anti-Aircraft battery behind the Barracks was built in the late 1930’s and altered in the 40’s.

The Bunker and concrete shelters on the Heights at Maker are a very important part of the 200 year long military history of the site. Most significantly, they formed part of the front-line defences of Plymouth during it’s greatest threat, the air-raids of the Second World War.

 

Many American troops were mustered on the Rame Peninsula before D-Day in 1944.

 

“By Monday evening 28 April [1941], we had seen the spectacle of a great city and dockyard in flames and the black smoke rising from the fuel tanks at Torpoint; we heard the startlingly sudden reports from the A.A. battery and the deep zoom of the naval guns”.  Dr H.J.Hewitt (the first Headmaster of Saltash County Grammar)

 

 

TOC past and present...

 

Nancy Astor was the first woman ever to sit as a member of Parliament.

It was Nancy Astor who suggested in 1925 that a committee investigate the possibility of establishing a camp for juveniles, out of concern for the effects of unemployment and poverty on their health and morale.

 

With the help of Government grants and the release to the Committee of Maker Barracks, Maker Camp was established In the summer of 1926 and a long history of providing holidays and fresh country air for children had begun.

 

Maker Camp took hundreds of boys and girls at a time, from organisations like the Kitto institute and the Boys  Brigade, for periods from a week-end to a whole month, allowing the children the space and nature of Maker and the Rame Peninsula as a relief from their lives in the city.

 

Between 1926 and 1985, thousands of children from many towns and cities in Britain came to Maker and enjoyed holidays, and it was only the lack of investment in the buildings that eventually led to the Camp closing down. Hardly a day goes by without Maker receiving a visitor from the past...

 

Familiar reminiscences are of the girls camped out in the nissen huts and the boys in the bar-rack rooms in the main building. There also seem to be plenty of stories about times when boys and girls were not quite where they were supposed to be

 

“Back in 1949 my late wife and I had our first kiss at this gate.”

 

In 2003 the rebuilt and considerably more comfortable nissen huts welcomed the first school groups back to Maker Heights for their residential trip. The visitors books are testament to new generations of young people once again enjoying their stay at Maker.

 

Canoeing and kayaking on Millbrook lake, problem solving and shelter building in Maker wood-lands and enjoying coastal walks are all part of the fun and games associated with the TOC

 

“One night in 1982, during a terrific storm, a tree crashed through the roof of the nissen hut, and sliced between the two rows of beds. The night-duty nurse simply clapped her hands and called “Come on girls! Chop Chop! Back into bed! Don’t make a fuss!”

 

 

 

MAKER WITH RAME COMMUNITY INTEREST COMPANY.

Reg Address: Insworke Mill, Mill Road, Millbrook. Cornwall. PL10 1EN.

Company No: 10348127